Restorative Dentistry

Fillings

Fillings

A filling is a way to restore a decayed tooth back to its normal shape and function.   If you have a tooth that requires a filling, the dentist will first remove the decayed tooth material, then clean the affected area and fill the cleaned-out cavity with a filling material. This filling will help prevent further decay by closing off any cracks or spaces where bacteria might enter.   There are…

Crowns

Crowns

Crowns are used to restore and enhance teeth that are damaged, or to replace missing teeth. A crown, also called a cap, is used to entirely cover a damaged tooth. A crown not only strengthens the tooth, but it can also dramatically improve the tooth's appearance, shape and alignment. Crowns may be used to… Replace a large filling when there is little tooth structure remaining Protect a weak…

Bridges

Bridges

A bridge is an ideal method to fill the space created by missing teeth. A bridge is one or more artificial teeth that are cemented into place using the real teeth on either side for support--hence the name.   Bridges are a perfect option for filling the space created by a missing tooth. A bridge replaces the missing tooth both functionally and cosmetically. Bridge work is as much an art as it is an…

Implant Placement

Implant Placement

A dental implant is an ideal tooth restoration for people who are missing one or more teeth for reasons like injury or periodontal disease. To begin the implant process, a metal post is surgically positioned into the jaw. This post will act as a permanent “root” for the implanted tooth. Once it is in place, the surrounding bone and tissue needs time to heal.   Implant placement requires…

Implant Restoration

Implant Restoration

A dental implant is an ideal tooth restoration for people who are missing one or more teeth for reasons like injury or periodontal disease. After a metal post is placed, the restoration is completed with a replacement crown.   While implants are typically more expensive than other methods of tooth replacement, they provide superior benefits. Implants are stronger than natural teeth and generally last…

Implant Supported Dentures

Implant Supported Dentures

For patients missing a majority of their teeth, implant-supported dentures are commonly used. Implant-supported dentures are dentures that are secured in place using implants in the jaw. They are often used when a patient no longer has teeth remaining in their mouth but enough bone in their jaw to support implants. Implant-supported dentures snap into place on top of implants but can be removed for cleaning.…

Dentures

Dentures

A denture is a removable replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissues. There are two types of dentures available: partial dentures and complete dentures.   Partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain and complete dentures are used to replace all teeth. Dentures are made to resemble your natural teeth, so there should be no noticeable change to appearance. In fact,…

Overdentures

Overdentures

Overdentures, also known as implant-supported dentures, are dentures that are attached to implants in the jaw.   An overdenture is used when a patient no longer has teeth remaining in their mouth but enough bone in their jaw to support implants. Overdentures snap into place on top of implants but can be removed for cleaning. 

Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth are the last molars, or "third molars" that develop on each side of the jaw. They usually emerge in the back of the mouth between the ages of 16-20.   Wisdom teeth are a valuable asset to the mouth when they are healthy and properly positioned. Often, however, they cause problems and require removal. When the jaw isn't large enough to accommodate wisdom teeth, they can become…

Tongue Tie & Lip Tie

Tongue Tie & Lip Tie

Nursing mothers that are experiencing nipple pain, uneven breast drainage, or low milk supply may have an infant with tongue and lip-tie.   Tongue and lip tie is a condition in which the center of the tongue has difficulty rising from the floor of the mouth because the tissue (lingual frenulum) that attaches the tongue's tip to the floor of the mouth is unusually short, think or tight. While tongue…